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Archive for the ‘Patterns’ Category

Amazon Dry Goods
www.AmazonDryGoods.com
This seller of Victorian ephemera is going out of business. The owner is ill and sales are down so they’re selling off their stock at deep discounts. A huge portion of what they sell is books and patterns but they also carry shoes, undergarments (hoops, stockings, camisoles, etc.), detachable collars, accessories of all sorts and Civil War reenactment props. There is a bunch of stuff that looks very steampunk. They have finally put their catalogs on the website (so you don’t have to buy them!). Take a look while you still can.

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Greenberg and Hammer
www.greenberg-hammer.com
Greenberg and Hammer was a New York City Garment District landmark shop that sold every kind of sewing supply you could possibly imagine (many that weren’t even made anymore but had been languishing on their shelves for years). Visiting their store was always a memorable experience. It was full to over-flowing and not always that clean, but it had that old New York charm that is becoming rarer and rarer. It will be missed.

This article from Crain’s offers some paltry details.

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If you haven’t checked out www.CorsetsandCrinolines.com, you should do so right away. They sell vintage and antique clothes. Their selection of mid-century underpinnings (garters, bras, hose, girdles, etc.) is divine. The only downside is that they are located in Great Britain. They do ship to the US but when you have to pay in pounds and add the cost of shipping, it becomes a little more than the average girl can cough up.

On the plus side, they have a very nice timeline of fashion from the beginning of the Victorian Era through the end of the Edwardian, complete with photos of actual garments from their collection. This is a great costume history reference to keep in your back pocket.

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Farthingales Corset Blog (farthingalescorsetblog.blogspot.com)
Linda Sparks literally wrote the book on how to make a corset (The Basics of Corset Building). She owns the sewing supply company Farthingales, originally based in Canada, they also have a location in Los Angeles. Farthingales specializes in corset supplies. Her blog mostly consists of announcements for the various classes she and others in her company teach. But check out her other sites for great info like the Tips and Tricks page on her L.A. website.

Good Quick Cheap (www.goodquickcheap.net)
David T. Howard is a professor and resident costume designer at the University of Rhode Island. His blog focuses on costume design and construction. He posts lots of pictures of vintage and antique clothing from the school’s stock. He also posts some of his design renderings and the photos of the corresponding finished garments. This is a great resource for anyone interested in costume design.

Oh So Happy Together (ohsohappytogether.blogspot.com)
Jessica obviously loves to sew for her daughter. This blog is full of tutorials on fun kid- and adult-oriented craft and sewing projects. One of my favorites is The Dress Up Skirt (i.e. Tutu). I also love the photos of a gorgeous, vintage inspired, girl’s sailor dress she made.

The Sassy Crafter (sassycrafter.blogspot.com)
is “a writer and crafty gal who loves transforming old things into hip new accessories for you and your home.” Her blog consists of stories and projects about a mix of sewing and crafts. She writes excellent tutorials with thorough instructions and informative photos. Some of my favorites are The DIY Bobbin Organizer, The Executive Chef Apron, and The Re-purposed Top.

Sew Retro (sewretro.blogspot.com)
You probably already know all about this gem. Members post their vintage inspired creations. There are a lot of posts that are just ads trying to get you to visit a member’s personal blog but this is actually a decent way to find other interesting sewing blogs and project tutorials. Members also post about occasional freebies and give-aways.

Threadbanger (www.threadbanger.com)
Threadbanger is a video blog that focuses on DIY sewing projects. Some are fashion related and some are about home decorating. The videos are made by the Threadbanger staff, by guest artists, and by viewers. So, if you have a super cool tutorial you want to send them, you might be featured on a future episode!

Custom Costumes

Photo Gallery

Sewing lessons

sarah@sarahbeata.net

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Not long ago I got a call from the production manager at Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma. It seems the paint on their set was not quite dry during first dress and some (borrowed, all white) costumes got permanently dirty. They had 4 days and not a lot of budget to replace 4 pieces. Luckily it was the weekend and I didn’t have much planned so I said, sure, why not. The sewing was pretty easy stuff and went fairly quickly. The pantaloons and pinafore were done on Saturday and the dress shortly thereafter. I modified a commercial pants pattern for the pantaloons; I used the damaged pinafore to create a replacement pattern for that piece; and I bought a pattern for a nightgown and drafted a collar for it to create the prairie dress. They are all made of printed cotton and have cotton lace trim. The pinafore is completely self-lined and uses the wrong side of the same fabric as the prairie dress.

sarah@sarahbeata.net

Custom Costumes

Photo Gallery

Sewing lessons

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Duct Tape Corset Pattern Class

• 6th Street Playhouse, Santa Rosa, CA
• Saturday, May 8th, 2010
• 1 PM to 5 PM
• $35 per person

Have you ever wanted to make a corset for yourself but were afraid it was too complicated?

Have you tried to make one and just couldn’t get it to fit comfortably?

I have the solution. I’ll be giving a class on how to make a custom corset pattern using duct tape and an old T-shirt.

This method creates a pattern that is exactly the right size and shape to fit you perfectly. It’s very easy to do (with a little help from your friends).

Come get wrapped in duct tape! I’ll guide you through the process and you’ll leave with the perfect custom-fit corset pattern.

Bring:
• A picture of what you’d like the corset to look like; try to get a view of the back as well. Drawings, photos, books, etc. are all fine.
• Your own T-shirt and be ready to sacrifice it to the god of fashion.

6th Street Playhouse in Santa Rosa on Saturday, May 8th from 1 PM to 5 PM. $35 per person.

See photos from the last corset pattern-making demo I did at the Nova Albion Steampunk Exhibition.

Sewing Lessons

Custom Costumes

Costume Gallery

sarah@sarahbeata.net

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On Saturday March 13, 2010 I gave a demonstration on how to draft the perfect custom corset pattern using duct tape and an old T-shirt at the Nova Albion Steampunk Exhibition.

This method works extremely well and is almost fool-proof. I’ve tried making corsets from store-bought patterns; they never fit right and it’s hard to know how to adjust them. I’ve tried draping a corset on a dress-form but, as you can imagine, that doesn’t work very well because a dress-form has no “fleshy” give. Using the duct tape method you get the right size and shape to begin with as you can control every aspect of the fit.

The general idea is to wrap yourself in duct tape and draw the seam lines on. You then cut off the duct taped T-shirt, cut along the seam lines and trace the resulting pieces on to paper. They usually need adjustment so that the lines are nice and even and the pieces “true” to one another.

Here are step-by-step instructions on how to make your own duct tape corset pattern.

Click here to download a PDF: Duct Tape Corset Pattern

Following are photos from the Steampunk Exhibition. Many thanks to Iana and Rachel for their invaluable assistance.

Sewing Lessons

Custom Costumes

Costume Gallery

sarah@sarahbeata.net

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